Intel designs a chip that can smell hazardous chemicals

Neuromorphic Computing

Intel developed the Loihi chip back in 2017 intending to make it emulate the human brain. Seems like it’s well on its way to doing just that. But Intel isn’t the only one currently researching neuromorphic computing, which is a specific area of artificial intelligence (AI). Neuromorphic computing is also being investigated by IBM, HPE, MIT, Purdue, Stanford, and others. The Loihi chip consists of a complete of some 130,000 neurons, every of which can talk with lots of others. Developers can get admission to and manipulate on-chip assets programmatically by using the ability to gain knowledge of the engine that is embedded in every one of the 128 cores.

Intel is one step nearer to replicating some components of the human Genius on a computer chip: the organization has posted a new lookup into an algorithm successful of smelling – or rather, of recognizing what it is smelling. Intel is also looking to use its “Pohoiki Springs” network, which is built from 768 of its Loihi neuromorphic chips, in several different applications, one of which could be to help combat COVID-19. In a statement, Intel said that while Pohoiki Springs won’t replace every-day computing systems, “they provide a tool for researchers to develop and characterize new neuro-inspired algorithms for real-time processing, problem-solving, adaptation, and learning.” Pohoiki Springs is capable of producing different scenarios about how COVID-19 might continue to spread, which could help scientists learn how to best slow it down or stop it altogether.

The Loihi chip consists of a complete of some 130,000 neurons, every of which can talk with lots of others. Developers can get admission to and manipulate on-chip assets programmatically by using the ability to gain knowledge of the engine that is embedded in every one of the 128 cores.

As a result, now not solely used to be Loihi successful of mastering and figuring out the scents it used to be introduced with; however, it confirmed that it should odor efficaciously even in the case of history interference. In the future, the tech would possibly allow "electronic noses" and robots to observe weapons, explosives, narcotics, and even diseases.

                 

How does it work?

According to Intel, the chip can end up conscious of 10 smells, alongside with acetone, ammonia, and methane, even when exceptional strong smells are present. And, Loihi realized each scent with surely a single sample. That's often impressive, the researchers say, due to the truth exceptional deep gaining knowledge of strategies can require 3,000 cases greater teaching samples to obtain the same diploma of accuracy.

Their work, profiled in Nature Machine Intelligence today, is a "prime occasion of the contemporary search for taking neighborhood at the crossroads of neuroscience and artificial intelligence," cited Nabil Imam, a senior look up scientist in Intel Labs' neuromorphic computing group.

What role does it play?

Ultimately, the researcher's aim is to observe neuromorphic to a wider vary of use-cases. "My subsequent step is to generalize this method to a wider variety of issues – from sensory scene evaluation to summary issues like planning and decision-making," he said. "Understanding how the brain's neural circuits clear up these complicated computational issues will furnish essential clues for designing environment-friendly and strong laptop intelligence."

                   

Other research like it

Intel and Cornell University are now not on my personal in their efforts to educate AI to find out smells. The Google Brain Team is working with perfumers to hyperlink scent molecules with perceived smells. Russian researchers are the utilization of AI to sniff out deadly fuel mixtures, and researchers have tried to recreate the scent of an extinct flower with laptop learning.


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